Service Delivery

SERVICE DELIVERY

Introduction

Phase 1 of the Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (NURHI) contributed to an impressive 11.5% increase in modern contraceptive use among women of childbearing age over its five years of implementation (NURHI Endline Report, 2014). As a result, over 350,000 more families began using modern family planning methods in implementation states. NURHI 2 scaled up proven interventions from Phase 1 to replicate these results in Kaduna, Lagos and Oyo states and facilitated the institutionalisation of the NURHI 2 service delivery strategy into existing and new systems.

The NURHI 2 service delivery strategy focused on improving the quality of and expanding equitable access to family planning services. Quality improvement in service delivery ensures that all clients are provided accurate and unbiased family planning information, and safe and caring family planning services. It also includes fostering an in-clinic environment that facilitates provision of confidential and safe family planning services, training providers in counselling and contraceptive provision, and developing and disseminating tools that enhance the quality of service delivery.

NURHI 2 expanded equitable access to family planning services through new and existing service delivery channels. This includes removing barriers to accessing family planning services and proactively taking services to underserved communities. Details of these two interventions can be found in the NURHI 2 service delivery protocol.


Documents

NURHI 2 Service Delivery Strategy

NURHI 2 Service Delivery Protocol

NURHI Phase 1 (2009 – 2015)

Phase 1 of NURHI was implemented in six cities (Federal Capital Territory, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, Benin and Zaria). According to the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, it contributed to significant increases in contraceptive prevalence in these cities.

NURHI Phase 1 (2009 – 2015)

Phase 1 of NURHI was implemented in six cities (Federal Capital Territory, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, Benin and Zaria).According to the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, it contributed to significant increases in contraceptive prevalence in these cities.