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Kaduna State

Kaduna State is the third most populous state in Nigeria. According to the 2006 national census, the population of Kaduna State was 6,113,503. Using the 3% growth rate reported by the National Population Commission, the 2015-projected population for Kaduna State was 8,068,761[1].

Kaduna has distinct differences in religion, ethnicity, traditions, and social norms between the predominantly Hausa/Moslem population in the northern part of the state and Christians of a variety of ethnic groups in the southern part. Kaduna town, the state capital, was the administrative and military capital of the defunct Northern Region and remains the unofficial political capital of northern Nigeria. Hausa language is widely spoken across the state, and traditional leaders have significant influence on the government and people of Kaduna. The state has 32 autonomous traditional institutions in the form of Emirate councils mostly in the northern part and chiefdoms in the southern part of the state.

 

The population of Kaduna State is fairly evenly split between urban (45.8%) and rural (54.2%) areas. Almost all the industries in Kaduna State are located in Zaria and Kaduna, and nearly two million people live in the two cities[2]. Map 1 shows the LGAs that are above and below the median population per state, which serve as proxies for rural and urban[3].

Map 1: Distribution of Rural and Urban LGAs, Kaduna State 2015


Figure 1: Percent of Kaduna Population by Wealth Quintiles, 2013 NDHS


As can be seen in Figure 1, 34.7% of the Kaduna population are in the lowest two wealth quintiles; and 23.3% are in the wealthiest quintile[4]. According to the 2013 Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS 2013), the state is more or less equally split between Muslims (50.4%) and Christians (49.7%).

Kaduna state experienced a steadily decreasing total fertility rate (TFR) between 2003 and 2013, with a TFR of 4.1 well below the national TFR of 5.5 in 2013. As shown in Figure 2, contraceptive prevalence rates for modern contraceptives also increased substantially between 2008 and 2013.  At 18.5%, contraceptive prevalence for modern methods among married women was also higher than the national rate of 9.8% [5].

Comparisons of contraceptive method use across the 2008 and 2013 NDHS is difficult due to differing definitions of modern methods. However, some of the increase can be attributed to an increase in use of injectables and the introduction of implants, which were not available in 2008 [6].


A landscaping analysis conducted for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2015 by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, Marie Stopes International Organization Nigeria and DKT International Nigeria proposed the following nine solution levers for Kaduna state in order of priority, based on estimated time to impact, impact on contraceptive use, and ease of implementation:

  1. Organize clinical outreaches to quickly expand LARC and injectables to underserved populations.
  2. Offer community-based services for underserved populations.
  3. Conduct multi-channel targeted demand creation and communication campaigns.
  4. Integrate family planning information, counseling, and referral with other health services.
  5. Operationalize the Community Health Extension Worker policy for administration of injectables, IUDs, and implants.
  6. Strengthen the capacity of family planning providers to administer long-acting reversible contraceptive methods.
  7. Strengthen coordination and health systems across private sector, local government areas, State Ministry of Health, and donors.
  8. Build capacity of religious and traditional leaders to advocate for family planning.
  9. Promote greater participation of Proprietary and Patent Medical Vendors in the Kaduna State family planning program.

[1] —, Policy Analysis of Family Planning Landscape in Lagos and Kaduna States, Abuja: MSION, 2015

[2] National Population Commission (NPC) Nigeria and ICF International. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013. Abuja, Nigeria and Rockville, Maryland : NPC and ICF, 2014.

[3] Berman, A., Akiode, A., Babalola, S. Mapping of Public and Large Private Health Facilities in Kaduna State. Baltimore : s.n., 2015.

[4] National Population Commission (NPC) Nigeria and ICF International. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013. Abuja, Nigeria and Rockville, Maryland : NPC and ICF, 20144

[5] International, National Population Commission and ICF. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013. Abuja and Rockville : NPC and ICF International, 2014.

[6] National Population Commission (NPC) Nigeria and ICF International. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013. Abuja, Nigeria and Rockville, Maryland : NPC and ICF, 2014.

NURHI Phase 1 (2009 – 2015)

Phase 1 of NURHI was implemented in six cities (Federal Capital Territory, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, Benin and Zaria). According to the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, it contributed to significant increases in contraceptive prevalence in these cities.

NURHI Phase 1 (2009 – 2015)

Phase 1 of NURHI was implemented in six cities (Federal Capital Territory, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, Benin and Zaria).According to the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, it contributed to significant increases in contraceptive prevalence in these cities.